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Artist Uses Petrified Wood to Create ‘Hollow’ Art Installation

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Artist Katie Paterson—in conjunction with architects Zeller & Moye—was commissioned by the University of Bristol to produce Hollow, an art installation whose permanent home is now at the university’s Royal Fort Gardens (open to the public). Conceived as a “miniature forest,” the installation is made up of over 10,000 of the world’s tree species, including petrified wood fossils that date back to 390 million years ago. For more on the artist’s work, click here. Take a visual tour of the installation below, and watch a short video of Paterson viewing her work from the inside at the bottom.

Hollow Art Installation
(Katie Paterson and Zeller & Moye, Hollow, 2016. Courtesy of University of Bristol and Situations, photo: Max McClure)
Hollow Art Installation
(Katie Paterson and Zeller & Moye, Hollow, 2016. Courtesy of University of Bristol and Situations, photo: Max McClure)
Hollow Art Installation
(Katie Paterson and Zeller & Moye, Hollow, 2016. Courtesy of University of Bristol and Situations, photo: Max McClure)
Hollow Art Installation
(Katie Paterson and Zeller & Moye, Hollow, 2016. Courtesy of University of Bristol and Situations, photo: Max McClure)
Hollow Art Installation
(Katie Paterson and Zeller & Moye, Hollow, 2016. Courtesy of University of Bristol and Situations, photo: Max McClure)
Hollow Art Installation
(Katie Paterson and Zeller & Moye, Hollow, 2016. Courtesy of University of Bristol and Situations, photo: Max McClure)
Hollow Art Installation
(Katie Paterson and Zeller & Moye, Hollow, 2016. Courtesy of University of Bristol and Situations, photo: Max McClure)
Hollow Art Installation
(Katie Paterson and Zeller & Moye, Hollow, 2016. Courtesy of University of Bristol and Situations, photo: Max McClure)