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Minimalist Firm Takes the Architectural World by Storm

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New Zealand’s Fearon Hay is making a name for itself in the world of architecture. The Auckland-based architects are known for embracing the environment their projects are constructed in. Whether it is on a mountaintop or in an old industrial warehouse, Fearon Hay takes the limitations and opportunities each project provides and utilizes them to the fullest extent.  RealClearLife has rounded out some the best examples of Fearon Hay’s work below.
 

Island Retreat in Auckland, New Zealand

This arrangement of freestanding structures provides sweeping views of Matiatia Bay. It may look more like a military compound than a home, but the buildings’ canopy-like structure combined with their contrasting use of concrete and glass give them a contemporary charm. The landscape around the home was reconstructed to form a bowl around the buildings that opens up to the bay. The home’s outdoor spaces and floor-to-ceiling windows give the cold, minimalist home an earthy feel.

(Patrick Reynolds)
(Patrick Reynolds)
(Patrick Reynolds)
(Patrick Reynolds)
(Patrick Reynolds)
(Patrick Reynolds)

 

Tribeca Loft in New York, New York

While most of Fearon Hay’s work is done in New Zealand, their project in New York City proves that they can meet the challenge of designing a loft in a city where space is limited. Their Tribeca loft is a 5,920-square-foot conversion defined by its exposed concrete and large multi-paned windows on all but one side of the unit. Its owners specifically requested that Fearon Hay keep the area spacious but private. As desired, various areas of the loft can be separated or connected through a combination of curtains, sliding doors, and full-length shades. The bathroom was designed to incorporate custom-blown glass pendant lights, treated steel, and a freestanding sink and bath.

(Richard Powers)
(Richard Powers)
(Richard Powers)
(Richard Powers)
(Richard Powers)
(Richard Powers)

 

Storm Cottage near Auckland, New Zealand

Located on Great Barrier Island’s east coast, this black, rough-sawn timber box is positioned northward with views of the bay. The all-black exterior is finished with a set of sliding metal screens. Fearon Hay’s home has a contrasting interior with warm, oiled-oak boards. Built symmetrically, the two identical bedrooms, with ensuite bathrooms, are on either side of the house with a center living space. Set on a remote part of the island, the home isn’t connected to local infrastructure. Instead, it is powered by solar panels and a separate system for water collection and treatment.

(Patrick Reynolds)
(Patrick Reynolds)
(Patrick Reynolds)
(Patrick Reynolds)
(Patrick Reynolds)
(Patrick Reynolds)

 

Mountain Retreat in Queenstown, New Zealand

Tucked away in New Zealand’s Southern Alps, overlooking Lake Wakatipu, this rugged hideaway uses colors and textures to blend in with the various surrounding rock surfaces. The home was designed to blend subtly into its alpine environment. Its use of sliding glass walls and floor-to-ceiling windows help integrate the outdoor spaces with the indoor ones. Intended to be muscular and refined, the home pays homage to the ruggedness of its environment while providing comfort as a retreat for those who choose to brave the terrain.

(Patrick Reynolds)
(Patrick Reynolds)
(Patrick Reynolds)
(Patrick Reynolds)
(Patrick Reynolds)
(Patrick Reynolds)

The Imperial Buildings in Auckland, New Zealand

The firm converted several historic industrial spaces, built between 1886 and 1911, into a multipurpose local bazaar in downtown Auckland. Fearon Hay repurposed the steel-and-brick spaces into five separate levels for commercial use, featuring multiple restaurants and bars. Two of the first retail spaces to open were Gucci and Louis Vuitton. The Imperial Buildings turned the neighborhood around, with this renovation and conversion of an adjacent road into a pedestrian walkway.

(Patrick Reynolds)
(Patrick Reynolds)
(Patrick Reynolds)
(Patrick Reynolds)
(Patrick Reynolds)
(Patrick Reynolds)