Mosque in Iraq Latest Priceless Monument to Be Lost in Conflict

The Middle East has a deep roster of priceless treasures from early civilizations. Recently, however, it has also been wracked by extreme conflict. As violence threatens more of this region’s greatest historical monuments, we look back at what has already been lost as a by-product of war.

Great Mosque of Al-Nuri
Great Mosque of Al-Nuri (Getty Images)

Great Mosque of Al-Nuri: Located in Mosul, Iraq, this mosque was famous for its leaning minaret. History says that the mosque was first built in the late 12th century, but it underwent many renovations over the years. It was destroyed by ISIS on June 21, 2017 during the Battle of Mosul. Iraqi troops say that it was a spiteful move by ISIS to destroy the building rather than let it be used as a symbol of their defeat.

Palmyra, Syria
Palmyra, Syria (Getty Images)

Palmyra, Syria: This Aramaic city has stood since the second millennium B.C.E. and featured some of the most advanced architecture of the period. The city evolved through both the Greco-Roman and Persian periods, which helped provide unique insight into those cultures. ISIS now controls the ancient city and has destroyed shrines, temples and monuments.

Al Askari Mosque
Al Askari Mosque (Getty Images)

al Askari Mosque, Iraq: This is one of the holiest sites in Shi’ite Islam. It had two ten-story minarets. First bombed in 2006, which destroyed the golden dome, the mosque was bombed again in June 2007 by the Iraqi Baath Party, destroying both minarets. However, by April 2009, the minarets were both replaced.

Buddhas of Bamiyan
Buddhas of Bamiyan (Getty Images)

Buddhas of Bamiyan: Found in Afghanistan and carved out of sandstone, these are among the tallest standing Buddhas in the world—the larger one measured 53 meters, the other 35. They stood for over 1,500 years before being destroyed by dynamite by the Taliban.

Sanaa old city, Yemen
Sanaa old city, Yemen (Getty Images)

Sanaa old city, Yemen: Sanaa, the capital of Yemen, has endured numerous ISIS suicide bombings and countless air strikes by the Saudi-led coalition. However, it is unclear who is responsible for the damage that affected the old fortified city and the archaeological site of the pre-Islamic walled city of Baraqish. The old city was added to UNESCO’s World Heritage List in 1986.

Ancient city of Bosra
Ancient city of Bosra (Getty Images)

Ancient city of Bosra, Syria: This city was inhabited for 2,500 years, and became the capital of the Romans’ Arabian empire. The centerpiece of the city was a Roman theater dating back to the second century B.C.E. It survived intact until the current civil war. Archeologists have revealed that the site is now severely damaged from mortar shelling.

Great Mosque of Aleppo
Great Mosque of Aleppo (Getty Images/AP Photo)

Great Mosque of Aleppo, Syria: Built in 715 A.D. by the Umayyad dynasty, Aleppo’s Great Mosque was ranked among the oldest mosques in the world. It also had a famous minaret, which was added in the late 11th century. Unfortunately, the minaret was reduced to rubble in the Syrian civil war in 2014, and the structure suffered serious damage to the walls and courtyard. Historians have described this as the worst blow to Syrian historical heritage.

Norias of Hama, Syria
Norias of Hama, Syria (Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images)

Norias of Hama, Syria: These 20-meter wide water wheels were first documented in the 5th century, A.D. They represented an early irrigation system and became Hama’s primary tourist attraction. Seventeen of the wooden machines survived to present day but heritage experts documented several wheels being burned by fighters in 2014.

Citadel of Aleppo
Citadel of Aleppo (Reuters)

Citadel of Aleppo, Syria: The fortress survived four millennia, from Alexander the Great, through Roman, Mongol, and Ottoman empires. It is one of Syria’s most popular World Heritage sites and it has barely changed since the 16th century. However, the citadel was used as an army base in recent fighting and several of its historic buildings have been destroyed.

Nimrud Iraq
Nimrud Iraq (AP Photo)

Nimrud, Iraq: This ancient city was home to countless treasures of the empire, including statues, monuments and jewels. The site has been devastated by looting following the 2003 invasion. Many of the stolen pieces have found homes in museums abroad.

Crac des Chevaliers
Crac des Chevaliers (Getty Images)

Crac des Chevaliers, Syria: This Crusader castle from the 11th century survived centuries of battles and natural disasters. It became a World Heritage site in 2006 along with the adjacent castle of Qal’at Salah El-Din. In 2013, the walls were severely damaged by regime airstrikes and artillery. Rebels then took positions within it, drawing more fire to the site.

Mosque of the Prophet Yunus or Jonah's Tomb
Jonah’s Tomb (Getty Images)

Jonah’s Tomb, Iraq: Dating back to the 8th century B.C.E., this is the purported resting place of biblical prophet Jonah, along with a tooth believed to be from the whale that consumed him. It had been of great importance to both Christian and Muslim faiths. In 2014, ISIS militants blew it up entirely as part of their campaign against perceived apostasy.

Khaled Ibn al-Walid mosque
Khaled Ibn al-Walid mosque (AFP/Getty Images)

Khaled Ibn Walid Mosque, Syria: This is among Syria’s most famous Ottoman-style mosques. It became a hub of the battle for Homs, itself a front-line of the conflict. The mausoleum has been completely destroyed, and much of the interiors burned.

Rare Andy Warhol Photos Hit Auction Block

As Andy Warhol himself used to say, “good business is the best art.”

So auctioneers are preparing for a masterpiece of sales when an extremely rare portfolio of Warhol’s photographs, depicting the cultural icons of the ’70s and ’80s, makes it to the auction block.

The photos, from the personal collection of famed photographer Patrick McMullan, are expected to fetch an estimated $100,000 to $150,000.

Images in the portfolio include a who’s who of cultural icons that include  Pope John Paul II, Henry Kissinger with Elizabeth Taylor, Jacqueline Onassis, Truman Capote, Salvador Dalí, and Tennessee Williams. There are also candid shots of Bianca Jagger shaving under her arm and Liza Minelli lying on the floor.

The portfolio is available on artnet Auctions from June 20-29.

Andy Warhol photographs
Salvador Dali and Ultra Violet (Courtesy Artnet)
Andy Warhol photographs
Truman Capote at home (Courtesy Artnet)
Andy Warhol photographs
Henry Kissinger and Elizabeth Taylor in Washington D.C. (Courtesy Artnet)
Andy Warhol photographs
Peter Malatesta and Monique Van Vooren (Courtesy Artnet)
Andy Warhol photographs
Andy Warhol, self portrait, Montauk, Long Island(Courtesy Artnet)
Andy Warhol photographs
Tennessee Williams and producer Lester Persky (Courtesy Artnet)
Andy Warhol photographs
Bianca Jagger, Liza Minnelli and Jacqueline Onassis in Liza’s dressing room. (Courtesy Artnet)
Andy Warhol photographs
Bianca Jagger at Halston’s House (Courtesy Artnet)
Andy Warhol photographs
Liza Minnelli at Halston’s House (Courtesy Artnet)
Andy Warhol photographs
Pope John Paul II in St. Peter’s Square, Rome (Courtesy Artnet)
Andy Warhol photographs
Diana Vreeland, “Empress of Fashion” (Courtesy Artnet)
Andy Warhol photographs
Halston at home (Courtesy Artnet)

 

 

U.S. Olympic Museum Designs Updated as Construction Begins

A new monument to American athletics is proving an Olympic undertaking.

New renderings for the U.S. Olympic Museum and Hall of Fame were released as construction begins in Colorado Springs. The project was designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, a New York-based architecture firm.

Described by the architects as an “experiential museum,” the new complex will house artifacts and media dedicated to the legacy of American athletes. Plans include a spacious plaza, theater, meeting halls, and exhibition spaces, according to Designboom.

The Denver Post reports the 65,000-square-foot space will cost $75 million. It will be the only museum dedicated to the U.S. Olympic program in the country. Lake Placid has a small museum devoted to the two winter games held there, but efforts elsewhere for a full-fledged complex haven’t been productive until now.

Once completed in 2019, the U.S. Olympic Museum will be a few blocks away from the Committee headquarters and a quick drive from the Olympic Training Center. Settled among foothills of the Rocky Mountains, the mix of indoor and outdoor spaces couldn’t have a better backdrop.

(Diller Scofidio + Renfro)
(Diller Scofidio + Renfro)
(Diller Scofidio + Renfro)
(Diller Scofidio + Renfro)
(Diller Scofidio + Renfro)
(Diller Scofidio + Renfro)
(Diller Scofidio + Renfro)
(Diller Scofidio + Renfro)

Never-Before-Seen Photos of Mount St. Helens Eruption Discovered in Goodwill Store

A photographer stumbled on the find of a lifetime after purchasing a vintage camera for $20 from a local Goodwill store in Portland, Oregon.

The Argus C2, a camera produced in the 1930s, would have been a worthy purchase by itself—but the roll of undeveloped film left in the camera turned out to contain never-before-seen photographs from the 1980 volcanic eruption of Mount St. Helens.

Photographer Kati Dimoff has made it a habit to always check thrift store cameras for undeveloped film ever since she found her first roll a few years ago. So she had modest hopes for the damaged roll of kodachrome slide film inside the Argus C2 she bought in May.

Mount St. Helens Eruption Photos
(Courtesy Kati Dimoff)

Dimoff brought the roll to Blue Moon Camera and Machine, one of the few places to still develop old, expired or out-of-production film in town. “When I picked up the prints on Monday, June 12th, there was a note on the package that said ‘is this from the Mt. St. Helens eruption’?” she told RealClearLife in an email. “Some of the shots showed Mount St. Helens way off in the distance with just the little puffs of ash from the beginning of the eruption.”

Two of the shots showed a larger, more ominous cloud with a local elementary school in St. Helens in the foreground.

Mount St. Helens Eruption Photos
(Courtesy Kati Dimoff)

When asked what went through her mind when she saw the prints for the first time yourself and realized the extent of the find, Dimoff told RealClearLife, “Mount St. Helens is my favorite place. I grew up on the Oregon coast and would have been almost two years old when Mount St. Helens erupted. My parents remember ash falling in our yard even though we were hundreds of miles away.

“It’s always been a formative childhood event, even though I don’t personally remember it,” Dimoff added. “My family makes a day trip up to Loowit Lookout every summer.  It feels sacred there. The landscape, both what is still damaged and what has grown and come back since the eruption, is awe inspiring.

“When I realized my found film had images of the eruption, it felt like it was meant to be.”

Mount St. Helens Eruption Photos
(Courtesy Kati Dimoff)

The 38-year-old photographer was curious how anyone would shoot images of the iconic eruption and not run right out and get them developed. She found the answer to her question when a man contacted The Oregonian after seeing a story on Dimoff’s find that a friend sent him on Facebook.

Mount St. Helens Eruption Photos
Pictured (l to r): Karen Purvis, Faye Purvis, Tristan Purvis, and Mel Purvis (Courtesy Kati Dimoff)

Among the pictures shared with The Oregonian, was a shot that included a family in a backyard. That family turned out to be Mel Purvis, his wife Karen, his grandmother Faye and his son Tristan. “I almost fell out of my chair,”  Purvis told The Oregonian. “That’s me.”

He believes that photos and camera belonged to his grandmother.

Dimoff and Purvis have been in touch since the story has received worldwide attention. She plans to mail the camera, negatives and prints to Bend, Oregon where the Purvis family has lived since 2001 .

“Mel and I have been in contact via email,” said Dimoff. “He said he will treasure the camera and the prints.  He also said the whole thing has been remarkable.”

Mount St. Helens Eruption Photos
Kati Dimoff purchased this Argus C2 camera from a Goodwill store in Portland, Oregon (Courtesy Kati Dimoff)

The Portland native had no idea this story would be so interesting to so many people well outside her city. “I’m a very sentimental person, and I love old photographs. This chance happening has been really special,” she said.

Mount St. Helens Eruption Photos
Photographer Kati Dimoff (Courtesy Kati Dimoff)

Selena Gomez Stars in Coach’s Fall Ad Campaign, Photographed by Steven Meisel

One of the biggest names in music just solidified her place as a fashion icon, too.

Selena Gomez is the star of the new Coach campaign for this Fall. Shot by Steven Meisel, the ads feature the former Disney Channel actress posing in the back of a 1976 Plymouth Fury in New York City.

Selena Gomez Coach Fall 2017 Campaign
(Coach, Inc.)

The “Bad Liar” singer looks at ease as the lead for the luxury campaign. No doubt her selection as the new face of Coach was an effort to attract millennials to the line of luxe bags coming out in Autumn.

“Selena is a rebel and a romantic, a dreamer and a doer who boldly charts her own course,” Creative Director Stuart Vevers touted in a press release. “To me, she speaks to a generation; she connects.”

The pop star was equally as excited to be involved in the project. “I couldn’t be more proud to be the face of Coach,” says Gomez. “I’ve also loved working with Stuart, I admire his vision and his designs.”

In addition to the photos, Gomez stars in three short films timed for release with the new Coach bags in the collection.

Selena Gomez Coach Fall 2017 Campaign
(Coach, Inc.)
Selena Gomez Coach Fall 2017 Campaign
(Coach, Inc.)

Museum Of Bad Art Is a Masterpiece of Questionable Taste

The MoMA, Louvre and Smithsonian are renowned around the world among art patrons. The halls of MOBA are… less frequently traveled.

Visitors won’t find art masterpieces such as the Mona Lisa on the walls of this museum in Massachusetts—but they will find the ‘Mana Lisa’. That’s because MOBA, or the Museum Of Bad Art, is dedicated to, you guessed it, bad art.

With over 700 pieces in its collection, the MOBA is the “only museum dedicated to bringing the worst of art to the widest of audiences.”

Founded in 1993, the museum is a community-based, non-profit institution that has received attention from the likes of  NPR and the New York Times.

The name doesn’t mean the pieces go through much less scrutiny than higher brow art. Submissions sent it to the museum are reviewed by curators and must be original works of art, and pieces that would never hang in a museum.

Unfortunately, the museum will not accept children’s art submissions.

Museum of Bad Art
Dog Bites Man- Vlademar Cher (Used with permission of Museum Of Bad Art)
Museum Of Bad Art
Blue God- Anonymous (Used with permission of Museum Of Bad Art)
Museum of Bad Art
Woman Riding Crustacean- Anonymous (Used with permission of Museum Of Bad Art)
Museum of Bad Art
Eileen’s Uncle Phil- Anonymous (Used with permission of Museum Of Bad Art)
Museum of Bad Art
Ronan the Pug -Erin Rothgeb (Used with permission of Museum Of Bad Art)
Museum of Bad Art
Mana Lisa – Anonymous (Used with permission of Museum Of Bad Art)
Museum Of Bad Art
Baby Dolls- Dee Landerman (Used with permission of Museum Of Bad Art)
Museum of Bad Art
Sad Baby- Anonymous (Used with permission of Museum Of Bad Art)
Museum of Bad Art
Dog- Unknown (Used with permission of Museum Of Bad Art)
Museum of Bad Art
Gilded Nude- Anonymous (Used with permission of Museum Of Bad Art)
Hollywood Lips- Anonymous (Used with permission of Museum Of Bad Art)
Museum Of Bad Art)
He Was a Friend of Mine- Jack Owen (Used with permission of Museum Of Bad Art)

 

Hyperloop Hotel Transports Tourists Between Cities in Luxury Suite

One transport concept wants people to travel in style—in a luxury suite.

The Hyperloop Hotel combines the comfort of a luxury hotel room with the efficiency of the pneumatic tube style transportation.

By combining transportation and accommodation, guests don’t have to purchase a plane ticket and book a hotel. Instead, for $1,200, guests can relax in their room as the modular suites ferry them to their destination without ever having to step foot outside.

(Radical Innovation/Brendan Siebrecht)

Each pod would be made from a recycled shipping container, but decked out as a luxury hotel suite. It would include the usual amenities like a bed, bathroom, and a TV. The pods would also feature an office and a living room, Designboom reports.

Designed Brendan Siebrecht, the proposal was selected as the Student winner in the Radical Innovation competition. He planned for the system to connect thirteen cities across the United States including Seattle, San Fransisco, Austin, Chicago, Nashville, and New York City.

The Hyperloop Hotel would allow people to visit multiple cities in one day with travel plans arranged on a customized app.

(Radical Innovation/Brendan Siebrecht)
(Radical Innovation/Brendan Siebrecht)
(Radical Innovation/Brendan Siebrecht)
(Radical Innovation/Brendan Siebrecht)

Photographer Captured ‘The Arctic Melt’ as Evidence of Climate Change

Despite the beauty of a melting iceberg, the natural phenomenon is leaving a message that’s chilling.

Photographer Diane Tuft’s stunning images of the Arctic Circle area visual record that capture the beauty of a region before climate change alters it forever.

“My focus is really to show you how beautiful things are, how fragile they are, and how they change so quickly,” the photographer told RealClearLife. “It’s really rapid and very scary.”

Her abstract photographs of ice and water are on display this summer at the Marlborough Museum in an exhibition called The Arctic Meltopening on Wednesday June 21 and closing on July 20, 2017.

The Arctic Melt Diane Tuft
Seascape, Greenland Ice Sheet (Diane Tuft)

Rising temperatures are affecting the environment in unprecedented ways around the world, but the volume of ice in the Arctic makes it the most vulnerable of all. Because of this, Tuft felt compelled to document the region while it experienced such rapid change.

To provide a comprehensive scope of the problem, Tuft photographed three hard-to-reach locations: the mountain glaciers in Svalbard, Norway; the Artic Ocean’s sea ice, and Greenland’s ice sheet.

The Arctic Melt Diane Tuft
Amidst the Icebergs, Disko Bay, Greenland, 9:20 PM (Diane Tuft)

The photographer was “shocked” to witness the state she found at each location, she said. At the North Pole, for example, the ice was too thin to walk on and it was 32ºF—both highly unusual developments for the area. The Russian nuclear-powered icebreaker that brought her there had made easy progress through what would normally be thick, icy waters.

Tuft says Greenland was the most surprising for her personally because she had visited the same area just nine years earlier. Since 2007, the icebergs had shrunk by as much as 60 feet. “The ice sheet was no longer this powdery snow,” the photographer said. “It was now ridges of filth and ice, escaping from ponds and lakes of meltwater.”

To the uninformed, her work is simply a stunning background but the visuals become more troubling with more education on the scientific observations involved. “Most of my images are just really beautiful images. So, on their own, they probably don’t say very much,” she said.

The Arctic Melt Diane Tuft
Broken Arches, Disko Bay, Greenland (Diane Tuft)

‘Broken Arches,’ for example, is a dazzling photograph with a darker meaning. It features an iceberg in Svalbard with a hole through it and meltwater raining down on the other side. “If you look beyond the image,” Tuft explains “it’s not so beautiful.”

In addition to photography, Tuft also paints and sculpts. Her attraction to nature is something that always seems to seep into her work, having grown up playing outdoors. Whether hiking in the wilderness or building sculptures with twigs in the vast field behind her house, “I was always attracted to nature,” she said.

“When I pick up an art project, I might not necessarily think that’s what going to happen but it happens subconsciously no matter what,” she added.

The Arctic Melt Diane Tuft
Eqi Glacier, De Quervain Havn, Greenland (Diane Tuft)

Through her work, Tuft hopes to start a dialogue to “hopefully influence policy,” stressing the need for renewable energy. “It’s impossible to stop the process, but we can slow it down,” she says.

In addition to the Marlborough Gallery, her Arctic Melt project is available in a book published by Assouline. Tuft’s other photography has been displayed at the Whitney Museum of Art and the International Center of Photography, among other institutions.

The Arctic Melt Diane Tuft
Jakobshavn Glacier, Greenland, 9:26 PM (Diane Tuft)
The Arctic Melt Diane Tuft
Relics, Isfjorden, Norway (Diane Tuft)
The Arctic Melt Diane Tuft
The Arctic Melt, Greenland Sea, Arctic Ocean, 4:48 PM, 79 degrees N (Diane Tuft)
The Arctic Melt Diane Tuft
Permutations, Arctic Ocean, 11:04 PM, 89 degrees N (Diane Tuft)
The Arctic Melt Diane Tuft
Red Sandstone Ice, Holmströmøyra, Norway (Diane Tuft)
The Arctic Melt Diane Tuft
Ice Fold, Recherchebreen, Wedel Jarlsberg Land, Svalbard, Norway (Diane Tuft)

 

Inside Hawaii’s Hidden Network of Lava-Carved Caves

The Hawaiian town of Ocean View is home to only 4,500 residents, the Mauna Loa volcano and an endless network of hidden caves.

Over the past two decades, Ocean View has become an international destination for cavers, travelers who come to explore and map the Kipuka Kanohina, a network of lava caves 15 to 80 feet beneath the town.

Lava caves, or lava tubes, are formed in a geological instant — sometimes a year or two, but sometimes weeks — by an eruption from the Earth’s crust.

Exploring lava tubes
Author Joshua Foer explores Kazumura, the world’s longest mapped lava tube, which stretches more than 40 miles and in places is the size of a subway tunnel. Its grooved walls took shape in the wake of an eruption approximately 600 years ago. (Carsten Peter/National Geographic)

Most of Hawaii’s caves are formed by a type of syrupy lava flow called pahoehoe, National Geographic explains in its July issue. The lava pours down the volcano and is cooled by the air, solidifying to create “an elastic, skinlike outer layer.” But beneath that, the lava continues to ooze, eroding the ground beneath it and carving underground tunnels.

Hawaii probably has the most accessible lava tubes and Ocean View has become a prime place to explore them, including the 138-mile Lechuguilla Cave. Lechuguilla is widely regarded as one of the world’s most beautiful caves. National Geographic journalist Joshua Foer and photographer Carsten Peter followed veteran cavers Peter and Ann Bosted — who are full time residents of Ocean View — into a roadside cave entrance that they’d recently discovered.

Foer says the lava tube feels like it’s from another world: “Festooned with trippy Dr. Seuss–like ornaments, the lava tubes of Hawaii seem to belong on another planet.”

Last year’s eruption of the Kilauea volcano, on Hawaii’s Big Island, sent rivers of lava draining into the sea. Some of the molten rock gushed through tubes molded during previous episodes while other flows formed new tunnels, adding branches to the subterranean plumbing.( CJ Kale/National Geographic)
Pristine freshwater pools (right) are rare in Hawaii’s lava tubes. They may look inviting, but explorers say divers can become disoriented in the twisting passages or trapped by blockages or rockfall and run out of air. (Carsten Peter/National Geographic)
Author Joshua Foer explores Kazumura, the world’s longest mapped lava tube, which stretches more than 40 miles and in places is the size of a subway tunnel. Its grooved walls took shape in the wake of an eruption approximately 600 years ago. (Carsten Peter/National Geographic)
National Geographic June Issue
The images are featured in the June issue of National Geographic magazine (National Geographic Magazine)

Personal Submarines No Longer Science Fiction

A new breakthrough in luxury boating is close to surfacing. The Neyk Submarine, under construction in the Netherlands, is being billed as the a personal submarine that is anything but claustrophobic.

Designed by Ocean Submarine in collaboration with Rolls-Royce, MTU and Bosch, the 63-foot pressurized vessel is set to reach speeds of up to 15 knots and dive as deep as 500 feet, according to Luxatic.

The teardrop-shaped sub — which will be able to hold 12 passengers comfortably — will feature through-hull windows and an opulent interior. But it doesn’t stop there: There’s a library, bar and complete galley. The personal sub will also boast air conditioning and heating.

The Neyk Submarine
(Ocean Submarine)

The steel hull, the same diameter as a private jet, is high-yield and reinforced with steel rings.

The Neyk submarine has an innovative propulsion system that will allow it to complete tight turns and maneuver well. According to a press release, the Neyk Submarine was developed in line with the requirements of the Royal Netherlands Navy. The Navy also invested in a number of “sophisticated applications to be used on board and this knowledge is now being deployed to enhance the quality and facilities of luxury submarine version,” according to the company.

The prototype is set to launch by January 2018 and will be available in 66, 72, and 79 foot models when it hits the market.

The Neyk Submarine
(Ocean Submarine)
The Neyk Submarine
(Ocean Submarine)
The Neyk Submarine
(Ocean Submarine)
The Neyk Submarine
(Ocean Submarine)
The Neyk Submarine
(Ocean Submarine)
The Neyk Submarine
(Ocean Submarine)
The Neyk Submarine
(Ocean Submarine)
The Neyk Submarine
(Ocean Submarine)
The Neyk Submarine
(Ocean Submarine)

 

See Why Switzerland’s Art Basel 2017 Is Masterpiece of a Fair

Art Basel, one of the world’s largest and most prestigious art fairs, celebrated its 48th year in grand fashion in the Swiss town.

The works of 4,000 artists (ranging from early 20th century to contemporary artists) were selected by 291 renown galleries from 34 countries and six continents.

It is estimated that $2.8-3.4 billion will be bought and sold by the time the fair ends on Sunday.

Art Basel 2017
“Vivian” by New Zealander artist Francis Upritchard (Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images)
Art Basel 2017
A security guard stands behind “Titi Tire” by US artist Jeff Koons at the Gagosian gallery’s stand during Art Basel
(Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images)
Art Basel 2017
“Boy with red nose in a blue velvet dress” a painting by German visual artist Hans-Peter Feldmann (Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images)
Art Basel 2017
Artworks by Otto Piene “Blue Star Linz” and Secundino Hernandez “Four Seasons, Between Summer and Fall” (Harold Cunningham/Getty Images)
Art Basel 2017
Artwork by Yves Klein (Harold Cunningham/Getty Images)
Art Basel 2017
The artwork by John Baldessari “Ear Sofa; Nose Sconces with Flowers (in Stage Setting)” is displayed during Art Basel at Basel Messe in Basel, Switzerland. (Harold Cunningham/Getty Images)
Art Basel 2017
Speak Louder by US fabric sculptor, dancer, and performance artist Nick Cave is pictured at Unlimited show during Art Basel (Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images)
Art Basel 2017
A visitor looks at the artwork by Darren Bader during Art Basel at Basel Messe Basel, Switzerland. (Harold Cunningham/Getty Images)
Art Basel 2017
A painting by British painter and sculptor Glenn Brown is displayed at Gagosian gallery during Art Basel. (Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images)
Art Basel 2017
“Rob Pruitts Official Art World / Celebrity Look-alikes Series” by US conceptual artist Rob Pruitt at Unlimited show during Art Basel (Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images)
Art Basel 2017
“Sleeping girls” by Belgian visual artist Hans Op de Beeck (Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images)
Art Basel 2017
A woman walks past “Untitled” by Dutch artist David Nuur displayed at Pland B gallery during Art Basel (Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images)
Art Basel 2017
A visitor looks at artworks by Stefan Tcherepnin and Tobias Madison (Harold Cunningham/Getty Images)
Art Basel 2017
Artwork by Adrian Villar Rojas is displayed at Art Basel (Harold Cunningham/Getty Images)
Art Basel 2017
The artwork by Markus Schinwald “Maschine” is displayed for Art Basel at Basel Messe (Harold Cunningham/Getty Images)
Art Basel 2017
Artwork by Urs Fischer “Bruno & Yoyo” is displayed during Art Basel 2017 (Harold Cunningham/Getty Images)
Art Basel 2017
Artwork by Song Dong “Through the Wall” (Harold Cunningham/Getty Images)
Art Basel 2017
Mark Manders “Large Composition with Red” (Harold Cunningham/Getty Images)

 

Aeroboat’s S6 Concept Boat Is Something to Sea

British designer Claydon Reeves’ new boat would surely get James Bond’s seal of approval. The Aeroboat S6 marries luxury outdoor living with the thrill of high-performance cruising.

Designed for performance, the boat is powered by twin MTU V10 2000 M96 engines, courtesy of Rolls-Royce, and can hit an estimated top of 48 knots.

Aerobot S6
(Aeroboat)

The boat is designed with elegance in mind. The stern of the boat features a extendable swim platform that can be raised for boarding and lowered under the water as a beach-club ladder.

Aeroboat S6
(Aeroboat)

Hidden below deck is a cabin that’s packed with amenities. The lounge serves as an entertainment space during the day and converts to a double suite at night.  The galley is equipped with a kitchen area that boasts a fridge, coffee machine and the option of a fresh water maker. It also features a shower room and garage big enough to fit a 12-ft vessel or two jet skis.

Aerobot S6
(Aeroboat)
Aerobot S6
(Aeroboat)