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An Intimate Look Inside Bedrooms Across America

Photographer Barbara Peacock’s ‘American Bedroom’ explores who are as individuals and a nation.

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Photographer Barbara Peacock is on a mission to give us a glimpse into the bedrooms of average Americans.

Her ongoing project American Bedroom is a cultural and anthropological study of who we are as individuals and as a nation. Peacock’s portraits reveal the character and spirit of the individuals, couples and families. “I want to convey that within this careful and respectful glimpse of another’s life there lies a curiosity that we have about each other and the way we live our lives, no matter how disparate,” says Peacock.

The project began on the East coast about a year ago and has recently expanded to the South. The goal is to photograph all corners of the United States and ultimately exhibit and publish her photographs as a timeless look at the human condition. She is currently financing herself expects her series to be completed between 3-5 years.

American Bedroom has exposed her to all walks of life in the last year and has helped her learn quite a bit about her process and her subjects. “I am learning that there are a lot of lonely people. I am learning that people have stories they want to share if someone will listen…I am learning that being photographed can be an important moment in someone’s life. I am learning to listen,” she tells My Modern Met.

For her portraits, Peacock typically spends an hour with each subject and accompanies each photograph with a brief statement from her participants.

Take an intimate look into the American Bedroom below:

American Bedroom
Cassie- age 27: ‘There are many treasures scattered around my room. I sleep in the middle of my bounty much like a guarding dragon. I just moved back in with my Dad, I used to live with him as a child. Now, everyday I wake in my inner child’s familiar realm.” Sweden, Maine. (Barbara Peacock)
American Bedroom
Pepere– age 88: ‘When I wake up in the morning, I try to be very quiet so I don’t wake her, then I remember she is not there.” Jay, Maine (Barbara Peacock)
American Bedroom
Brent– age 52: ‘ I have these thoughts that culminate in my head, it took me years to get these souvenirs. I just moved into this place and all I have is an air mattress, but I stack up pillows and read and write.’ North Wilkesboro, North Carolina (Barbara Peacock)
American Bedroom
Karen & Christopher- ages 49 and 48: ‘Working hard is easy for us, but unwinding down takes time. Electronics stay out the bedroom so we can recharge the natural way, in each other’s arms.’ Park Slope, Brooklyn NY (Barbara Peacock)
American Bedroom
Jessica- age 18: ‘Sometimes life throws you in all sorts of directions, the most important part about life is to remember you are exactly where you need to be.’
Milford, New Hampshire (Barbara Peacock)
American Bedroom
Nito- age 28: ‘Much of what you see isn’t some showcase of fun colorful things I’ve acquired. Everything contains a story attached to my friends and life experiences. So, despite it’s cluttered look, having easy access to those cherished memories is quite calming and helps me still feel close to those people and experiences.’ Cambridge, Massachusetts (Barbara Peacock)
American Bedroom
Germaine- age 88: ‘I can’t walk far. I have to wait for everyone and everything.’ Westford Massachusetts (Barbara Peacock)
American Bedroom
Angel- age 6: ‘I like jumping on my Mom’s bed cause my bed is in a closet.’ (brother in background – Thor age 15) Westbrook, Maine (Barbara Peacock)
American Bedroom
Elmer- age 71: ‘I have lived a life of miracles, and I shall live forever, the flesh looks wasted but the spirit is alive and well.’ Boone, North Carolina (Barbara Peacock)
American Bedroom
Cody- age 15: ‘It’s been really frustrating. I can’t do anything. I can’t hang out with my friends, can’t play sports. I’m stuck here…just me and my illness.’ (Rheumatic Fever) Portland, Maine (Barbara Peacock)