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Photographing an Amazing Microscopic World

Photography By
USA: Feature Rates Apply Mandatory Credit: Photo by SpikeWalker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock (6047461o) Ephedrine vapour crystallized on cooling. Microscope images of creatures, vitamins, crystals, UK - Sep 2016 *Full story: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/srsr These incredible microscopic images of creatures, vitamins, crystals and even a fetus are to be recognised with an award from the Royal Photographic Society. Spike Walker has been fascinated by photomicrography since he got his first microscope just after the conclusion of the Second World War, when he was about 12-years-old. Now his life's passion is to be recognised with a Scientific Imaging Award from one of the world's oldest and prestigious photographic societies. The accolade is given to an individual for a body of photography which promotes public knowledge and understanding. The RPS said Spike's decades of work and immeasurable contribution to the field make him the perfect recipient.
Ephedrine vapor crystallized upon cooling. (SpikeWalker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock)

Behold these microscopic images of vitamins, crystals, and even a fetus so incredible they have been honored by the Royal Photographic Society.

The RPS honored photographer Spike Walker, 82, for his decades of work and immeasurable contribution to the field of scientific photography. His fascinating shots, in some cases magnified by 300 times, include an intracytoplasmic sperm injection: a procedure in which a single sperm is injected directly into an egg. (His personal favorite photo is the blue and orange picture of a male beetle using its suckers to grip the female during mating.)

Walker began his photomicrography career in 1947, two years after getting his first microscope at the age of 12. He graduated in 1956 from the University of Liverpool with a Bachelor of Science in Biology. He then began a dual career: from 1957 to 1989 he taught science in high schools and colleges, while also working as a freelance photomicrographer. He sold his first photomicrographs in 1961 and also received the 1961 Royal Society Award for Scientific Research.

See the work of a man brilliantly combining art and science below.

USA: Feature Rates Apply Mandatory Credit: Photo by SpikeWalker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock (6047461w) A minute wingless fly parasitic on honey bees. It lives on the body of the bee and feeds by sipping nectar from the hosts' mouth parts Microscope images of creatures, vitamins, crystals, UK - Sep 2016 *Full story: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/srsr These incredible microscopic images of creatures, vitamins, crystals and even a fetus are to be recognised with an award from the Royal Photographic Society. Spike Walker has been fascinated by photomicrography since he got his first microscope just after the conclusion of the Second World War, when he was about 12-years-old. Now his life's passion is to be recognised with a Scientific Imaging Award from one of the world's oldest and prestigious photographic societies. The accolade is given to an individual for a body of photography which promotes public knowledge and understanding. The RPS said Spike's decades of work and immeasurable contribution to the field make him the perfect recipient.
A wingless fly which parasitically lives off honey bees. (SpikeWalker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock)
USA: Feature Rates Apply Mandatory Credit: Photo by SpikeWalker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock (6047461u) Seed head of Centanthus ruber (Red Valerian). Microscope images of creatures, vitamins, crystals, UK - Sep 2016 *Full story: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/srsr These incredible microscopic images of creatures, vitamins, crystals and even a fetus are to be recognised with an award from the Royal Photographic Society. Spike Walker has been fascinated by photomicrography since he got his first microscope just after the conclusion of the Second World War, when he was about 12-years-old. Now his life's passion is to be recognised with a Scientific Imaging Award from one of the world's oldest and prestigious photographic societies. The accolade is given to an individual for a body of photography which promotes public knowledge and understanding. The RPS said Spike's decades of work and immeasurable contribution to the field make him the perfect recipient.
Seed head of Centanthus ruber (Red Valerian)(SpikeWalker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock)
USA: Feature Rates Apply Mandatory Credit: Photo by SpikeWalker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock (6047461s) Soldered connections on a computer memory stick Microscope images of creatures, vitamins, crystals, UK - Sep 2016 *Full story: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/srsr These incredible microscopic images of creatures, vitamins, crystals and even a fetus are to be recognised with an award from the Royal Photographic Society. Spike Walker has been fascinated by photomicrography since he got his first microscope just after the conclusion of the Second World War, when he was about 12-years-old. Now his life's passion is to be recognised with a Scientific Imaging Award from one of the world's oldest and prestigious photographic societies. The accolade is given to an individual for a body of photography which promotes public knowledge and understanding. The RPS said Spike's decades of work and immeasurable contribution to the field make him the perfect recipient.
The soldered connections on a computer memory stick. (SpikeWalker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock)
USA: Feature Rates Apply Mandatory Credit: Photo by SpikeWalker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock (6047461r) A group of one-celled freshwater algae. Microscope images of creatures, vitamins, crystals, UK - Sep 2016 *Full story: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/srsr These incredible microscopic images of creatures, vitamins, crystals and even a fetus are to be recognised with an award from the Royal Photographic Society. Spike Walker has been fascinated by photomicrography since he got his first microscope just after the conclusion of the Second World War, when he was about 12-years-old. Now his life's passion is to be recognised with a Scientific Imaging Award from one of the world's oldest and prestigious photographic societies. The accolade is given to an individual for a body of photography which promotes public knowledge and understanding. The RPS said Spike's decades of work and immeasurable contribution to the field make him the perfect recipient.
A group of one-celled freshwater algae. (SpikeWalker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock)
USA: Feature Rates Apply Mandatory Credit: Photo by SpikeWalker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock (6047461m) Histidine (an amino acid) crystallized from aqueous solution Microscope images of creatures, vitamins, crystals, UK - Sep 2016 *Full story: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/srsr These incredible microscopic images of creatures, vitamins, crystals and even a fetus are to be recognised with an award from the Royal Photographic Society. Spike Walker has been fascinated by photomicrography since he got his first microscope just after the conclusion of the Second World War, when he was about 12-years-old. Now his life's passion is to be recognised with a Scientific Imaging Award from one of the world's oldest and prestigious photographic societies. The accolade is given to an individual for a body of photography which promotes public knowledge and understanding. The RPS said Spike's decades of work and immeasurable contribution to the field make him the perfect recipient.
Histidine (an amino acid) crystalized from aqueous solution. (SpikeWalker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock)
USA: Feature Rates Apply Mandatory Credit: Photo by SpikeWalker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock (6047461l) A single sperm is taken up in a micropipette and inserted into a prepared oocyte which is held in position by suction within a second micropipette Microscope images of creatures, vitamins, crystals, UK - Sep 2016 *Full story: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/srsr These incredible microscopic images of creatures, vitamins, crystals and even a fetus are to be recognised with an award from the Royal Photographic Society. Spike Walker has been fascinated by photomicrography since he got his first microscope just after the conclusion of the Second World War, when he was about 12-years-old. Now his life's passion is to be recognised with a Scientific Imaging Award from one of the world's oldest and prestigious photographic societies. The accolade is given to an individual for a body of photography which promotes public knowledge and understanding. The RPS said Spike's decades of work and immeasurable contribution to the field make him the perfect recipient.
A single sperm is taken up in a micropipette and inserted into a prepared oocyte, which is held in position by suction within a second micropipette. (Spike Walker/ RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock)
USA: Feature Rates Apply Mandatory Credit: Photo by SpikeWalker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock (6047461j) The calcareous test (shell) of a mounted specimen of a tropical marine Foram from the China Sea. Microscope images of creatures, vitamins, crystals, UK - Sep 2016 *Full story: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/srsr These incredible microscopic images of creatures, vitamins, crystals and even a fetus are to be recognised with an award from the Royal Photographic Society. Spike Walker has been fascinated by photomicrography since he got his first microscope just after the conclusion of the Second World War, when he was about 12-years-old. Now his life's passion is to be recognised with a Scientific Imaging Award from one of the world's oldest and prestigious photographic societies. The accolade is given to an individual for a body of photography which promotes public knowledge and understanding. The RPS said Spike's decades of work and immeasurable contribution to the field make him the perfect recipient.
The shell of a mounted specimen of a tropical marine Foram from the China Sea. (Spike Walker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock)
USA: Feature Rates Apply Mandatory Credit: Photo by SpikeWalker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock (6047461i) Dytiscus marginalis is a large and powerful freshwater diving beetle and the males have developed plate-like proximal tarsal joints on their front legs, covered in suckers, with which to hold onto the female during mating. The photo shows a portion of such a joint with part of 1 of the 2 large suckers and 5 rows of small ones Microscope images of creatures, vitamins, crystals, UK - Sep 2016 *Full story: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/srsr These incredible microscopic images of creatures, vitamins, crystals and even a fetus are to be recognised with an award from the Royal Photographic Society. Spike Walker has been fascinated by photomicrography since he got his first microscope just after the conclusion of the Second World War, when he was about 12-years-old. Now his life's passion is to be recognised with a Scientific Imaging Award from one of the world's oldest and prestigious photographic societies. The accolade is given to an individual for a body of photography which promotes public knowledge and understanding. The RPS said Spike's decades of work and immeasurable contribution to the field make him the perfect recipient.
The suckers which a male freshwater diving beetle uses to hold onto the female during mating.  (Spike Walker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock)
USA: Feature Rates Apply Mandatory Credit: Photo by SpikeWalker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock (6047461g) Crystals of Paracetamol from alcoholic solution scratched to initiate crystallization Microscope images of creatures, vitamins, crystals, UK - Sep 2016 *Full story: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/srsr These incredible microscopic images of creatures, vitamins, crystals and even a fetus are to be recognised with an award from the Royal Photographic Society. Spike Walker has been fascinated by photomicrography since he got his first microscope just after the conclusion of the Second World War, when he was about 12-years-old. Now his life's passion is to be recognised with a Scientific Imaging Award from one of the world's oldest and prestigious photographic societies. The accolade is given to an individual for a body of photography which promotes public knowledge and understanding. The RPS said Spike's decades of work and immeasurable contribution to the field make him the perfect recipient.
Crystals of Paracetamol from alcoholic solution, scratched to initiate crystallization. (Spike Walker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock)
USA: Feature Rates Apply Mandatory Credit: Photo by SpikeWalker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock (6047461d) Living Spionid larvae from marine plankton. Microscope images of creatures, vitamins, crystals, UK - Sep 2016 *Full story: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/srsr These incredible microscopic images of creatures, vitamins, crystals and even a fetus are to be recognised with an award from the Royal Photographic Society. Spike Walker has been fascinated by photomicrography since he got his first microscope just after the conclusion of the Second World War, when he was about 12-years-old. Now his life's passion is to be recognised with a Scientific Imaging Award from one of the world's oldest and prestigious photographic societies. The accolade is given to an individual for a body of photography which promotes public knowledge and understanding. The RPS said Spike's decades of work and immeasurable contribution to the field make him the perfect recipient.
Living Spionid larvae from marine plankton. (Spike Walker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock)
USA: Feature Rates Apply Mandatory Credit: Photo by SpikeWalker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock (6047461b) Dandelion, stained cross section of the composite structure of the flower showing individual florets. Microscope images of creatures, vitamins, crystals, UK - Sep 2016 *Full story: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/srsr These incredible microscopic images of creatures, vitamins, crystals and even a fetus are to be recognised with an award from the Royal Photographic Society. Spike Walker has been fascinated by photomicrography since he got his first microscope just after the conclusion of the Second World War, when he was about 12-years-old. Now his life's passion is to be recognised with a Scientific Imaging Award from one of the world's oldest and prestigious photographic societies. The accolade is given to an individual for a body of photography which promotes public knowledge and understanding. The RPS said Spike's decades of work and immeasurable contribution to the field make him the perfect recipient.
A stained cross section of a dandelion. (Spike Walker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock)
USA: Feature Rates Apply Mandatory Credit: Photo by SpikeWalker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock (6047461ac) Mouse foetus, sagittal longitudinal section. Microscope images of creatures, vitamins, crystals, UK - Sep 2016 *Full story: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/srsr These incredible microscopic images of creatures, vitamins, crystals and even a fetus are to be recognised with an award from the Royal Photographic Society. Spike Walker has been fascinated by photomicrography since he got his first microscope just after the conclusion of the Second World War, when he was about 12-years-old. Now his life's passion is to be recognised with a Scientific Imaging Award from one of the world's oldest and prestigious photographic societies. The accolade is given to an individual for a body of photography which promotes public knowledge and understanding. The RPS said Spike's decades of work and immeasurable contribution to the field make him the perfect recipient.
Mouse fetus. (Spike Walker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock)
USA: Feature Rates Apply Mandatory Credit: Photo by SpikeWalker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock (6047461ab) Cell divission in a Desmid, Micrasterias apiculata (a type of one-celled freshwater alga). Microscope images of creatures, vitamins, crystals, UK - Sep 2016 *Full story: http://www.rexfeatures.com/nanolink/srsr These incredible microscopic images of creatures, vitamins, crystals and even a fetus are to be recognised with an award from the Royal Photographic Society. Spike Walker has been fascinated by photomicrography since he got his first microscope just after the conclusion of the Second World War, when he was about 12-years-old. Now his life's passion is to be recognised with a Scientific Imaging Award from one of the world's oldest and prestigious photographic societies. The accolade is given to an individual for a body of photography which promotes public knowledge and understanding. The RPS said Spike's decades of work and immeasurable contribution to the field make him the perfect recipient.
Cell division in a Desmid, Micrasterias apiculata (a type of one-celled freshwater algae). (Spike Walker/RPS/Bournemouth/REX/Shutterstock)