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Remembering Pearl Harbor 76 Years Later Through Unforgettable Pictures

"A date which will live in infamy."

History By

It was 7:55 a.m. Hawaii time when the bombs started to fall. Over 2,400 people were killed on December 7, 1941, when the Japanese led a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor. The photographs from that day are still devastating to look at, 74 years later: Smoke, flames, bodies, debris. As the news and images spread across the world, President Franklin D. Roosevelt told the nation that the day “will live in infamy.” He declared war on Japan, and not long after that, Italy and Germany declared war on the U.S. The country was officially thrust into the Second World War.

Ordnance on the destroyer USS Shaw explodes after being hit by Japanese bombs, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, December 7, 1941. Silver print taken by a Navy photographer, 1941. (Photo by VCG Wilson/Corbis via Getty Images)
It’s crew is forced to abandon the USS California during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, December 7, 1941. Silver print, Navy photographer, 1941. (Photo by VCG Wilson/Corbis via Getty Images)
Japanese attack on the US Naval base at Pearl Harbour; 7th December 1941 (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
The USS Oklahoma floats capsized near the USS Maryland. The ships were destroyed during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on September 7, 1941. (Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
Burning and damaged ships at Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941. Left to right are the USS West Virginia, the USS Tennessee and the USS Arizona. (Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
World War II: Japanese attack on United States naval base at Pearl Harbour, Hawaii, 7 December 1941. Battleship USS West Virginia in, flames after hits from Japanese bombs and torpedoes. (Photo by Universal History Archive/Getty Images)
(Original Caption) 12/1941- Sailors on leave were the first to buy papers announcing the attack upon Hawaii and Philippines. They anxiously read the news and were told to report immediately to their posts.
(Original Caption) These headlines were from a New York newspaper telling of the start of the American-Japanese war, December 7, 1941.
Presidential Secretary Stephen T. Early, conducting a press conference in his White House office on day of Pearl Harbor attack. (Photo by Thomas D. Mcavoy/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)
Military personnel pay their respects beside the mass grave of 15 officers and others killed in the bombing attack at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. A U.S. flag is draped over the coffins. (Photo by © CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)
Read full story at The Washington Post