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What It’s Like to Go into Business With Bill Murray

Founders of theCHIVE.com detail what it's like working with 'Groundhog Day' actor.

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What is it like being in business with one of the most enigmatic comedic actors in Hollywood, Bill Murray?

“It started because we owed Bill Murray a lot of money,” John Resig, one-half of the brotherly duo that founded theCHIVE, recently told Entrepreneur. (Resig and his brother Leo recently added a Bill Murray–branded golf apparel business to their ridiculously popular web brand.)

Entrepreneur did a Q&A with the brothers about what it’s like working with Murray, and it turns out he’s as interesting a character off screen as he is on it.

-The Resigs relationship with the Groundhog Day actor began when they printed unlicensed t-shirts with Bill Murray on them and made a boatload of money in the process. When Murray caught wind of their business, he told the brothers to give the licensing money they owed him to charity.

-Business meetings with Bill Murray hinge entirely on whether or not he actually shows up to them.

-It’s also pretty much impossible to get ahold of him. Says John Resig: “The legend is true—you really can’t get a hold of the man. He has no agent and has an 800-number that you can leave a message on.”

-Regarding that oft-mythologized quirky sense of fashion, John Resig says there’s more than meets the eye. “He is very detail oriented. A lot of his outfits you see him wear out on the golf course look accidental. They’re not. At all. He thinks them through.”

-Circling back to that charitable side of Murray, John Resig notes that every time people order shirts from William Murray Golf, they get a letter from Bill telling them to donate to charity. “For Bill, it’s not about the money and it really never has been. Bill is doing it for two reasons: he’s having a blast and he wants to help his favorite charity in Chicago. And that’s really all he cares about.”

Watch an interview CNBC did with Bill Murray about his new clothing line.

Read full story at Entrepreneur