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Innovative Floating Ferry Terminal Concept Would Help Restore the Environment

Manta ray-shaped transport hub plans to use marshland plants to purify Seoul's Han River.

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The designers at Vincent Callebaut Architecture have come up with an new ferry terminal concept that is both green on top and bottom.

Their ingenious concept for sustainable development, a floating ferry terminal to be built on the Han River in Seoul, South Korea, aims to restore the natural environment and enhance natural irrigation by transforming the site into an ecological forest of willow trees. The design, nicknamed “Manta Ray” for the sea creature its swooping shape invokes,  also calls for an area with marshland plants that will strengthen the natural protection of the banks against river floods.

 

Manta Ray Floating Ferry Terminal
(Vincent Callebaut Architectures)

In their project statement, Vincent Vallebaut says: “The project’s ambition is to turn Yeouido Park into a genuine cultural hub, where nature progressively asserts its rights over the concrete city again to better protect it.”

A three-level ferry terminal would extend out from the the transformed park and would be suspended above a marina and gardens.

Manta Ray Floating Ferry Terminal
The first phase to be built would be this circular marina. (Vincent Callebaut Architecture)

The lower level of the terminal would feature floating steel dikes that would surround a circular marina and protect it from the water currents. It will integrate equipment to charge water taxis, yachts, small sailing boats and government ships with water, electricity and biofuels.

After the marina is built in phase one, the swooping roof and and upper platform will be added above it to house the entertainment, food courts, and exhibition and educational spaces. An observation deck and rooftop garden will top off the terminal.

Manta Ray Floating Ferry Terminal
Cross laminated timber is woven in honeycomb patterns to create tree-like structures that house spiral staircases, glass elevators, and ramps to the rooftop. (Vincent Callebaut Architectures)
Manta Ray Floating Ferry Terminal
(Vincent Callebaut Architectures)

The entire terminal will produce 100% of its energy needs through solar, wind, and organic and biodegradable waste.

Manta Ray Floating Ferry Terminal
(Vincent Callebaut Architectures)
Manta Ray Floating Ferry Terminal
(Vincent Callebaut Architectures)
Manta Ray Floating Ferry Terminal
(Vincent Callebaut Architectures)
Manta Ray Floating Ferry Terminal
(Vincent Callebaut Architectures)
Manta Ray Floating Ferry Terminal
(Vincent Callebaut Architectures)
Manta Ray Floating Ferry Terminal
(Vincent Callebaut Architectures)
Manta Ray Floating Ferry Terminal
(Vincent Callebaut Architectures)
Manta Ray Floating Ferry Terminal
(Vincent Callebaut Architectures)