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China Offers the Ultimate Unnerving Glass-Bottom Walkway

Travel RealClearLife Staff
ZHANGJIAJIE, CHINA - AUGUST 01: A tourist takes a selfie on the 100-meter-long and 1.6-meter-wide glass skywalk clung the cliff of Tianmen Mountain (or Tianmenshan Mountain) in Zhangjiajie National Forest Park on August 1, 2016 in Zhangjiajie, Hunan Province of China. The Coiling Dragon Cliff skywalk, featuring a total of 99 road turns, layers after another, is the third glass skywalk on the Tianmen Mountain (or Tianmenshan Mountain). (Photo by VCG/VCG via Getty Images)
A tourist takes a selfie on the 330-foot-long and five-foot-wide glass skywalk on the side of the cliff of Tianmen Mountain in Zhangjiajie National Forest Park on August 1, 2016, in the Hunan Province of China. (CG/VCG via Getty Images)

If you have any issues with heights, this hike is not for you. Located 4,600 feet above sea level on Tianmen Mountain in Tianmenshan National Park in China’s Hunan Province, the Coiling Dragon Cliff is a 330-foot-long walkway that’s just five feet wide and, oh yes, has a glass bottom. The result is a visual delight if you’re one of those people who can say, “It looks like I’m standing on nothing and facing an insanely long drop, but I know I’m safe.”

If you look down while riding an escalator and have a panic attack, stay away.

Watch the video at the bottom to determine if you find this appealing or unnerving. Not convinced? You could always do a test run on the world’s tallest and longest glass-bottomed bridge first.

ZHANGJIAJIE, CHINA - AUGUST 01: Aerial view of tourists walking on the 100-meter-long and 1.6-meter-wide glass skywalk clung the cliff of Tianmen Mountain (or Tianmenshan Mountain) in Zhangjiajie National Forest Park on August 1, 2016 in Zhangjiajie, Hunan Province of China. The Coiling Dragon Cliff skywalk, featuring a total of 99 road turns, layers after another, is the third glass skywalk on the Tianmen Mountain (or Tianmenshan Mountain). (Photo by VCG/VCG via Getty Images)
Aerial view of tourists walking on the 330-foot-long and five-foot-wide glass skywalk. (CG/VCG via Getty Images)