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Tips for Upgrading Your Home From Top Interior Designers

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Home showcase living room with rose bouquet (Hoxton/Tom Merton)
Home showcase living room with rose bouquet (Hoxton/Tom Merton)

 

As we all know, interior design is often a frustrating process, with endless questions and many hidden points of failure. And yes, the internet has a lot of resources on this topic, but they all disagree with one another.

Thankfully, frantic web searching isn’t the only game in town. Over at GQ, Louise Hart cracked open her copy of Interior Design Master Class: 100 Lessons from America’s Finest Designers on the Art of Decoration, and found a lot of helpful advice for home design in the classic style. Rather than base their advice on fads or experimental aesthetics, the contributors to this book default to styles and combinations that always look good.

For example, people with small living spaces (i.e. apartments) are urged to think creatively and use the space they have instead of fighting with it. One trick that design partners Daniel Sachs and Kevin Lindores have is covering the ceilings in narrow, dimly lit entryways to make them look lighter. Similarly, designer Celeste Cooper has used high gloss ceilings and reflective floors to extend light throughout even smaller apartments.

View of modern living room with sofas, coffee table and abstract painting (Astronaut Images)
View of modern living room with sofas, coffee table and abstract painting (Astronaut Images)

 

Also, get inspired by things you already like, and use your interests to guide you. If you like wild art, don’t avoid hanging it, just because it might not be “in” right now; put it up on the walls and pair it with simpler furniture. If you’re drawn to certain color schemes or combinations in films or art, see how they look in your living space. “Don’t fill your home with other people’s taste” is the message here.

Finally, designer Brad Ford practically begs readers to buy handmade furniture. They add warmth and interesting textures to a home, especially one in a city that’s full of mass-produced stuff. They also pair well with a lot of different furnishings, and vintage pieces are often less expensive than designer furniture, to boot. There’s a lot to be said for craftsmanship on display in a home.

If you’re interested in picking up a copy of Interior Design Master Class, you can buy one directly from the publisher, Rizzoli New York, here.