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Norway Plans the World’s First Ship Tunnel

Design By
(Kystverket / Norwegian Coastal Administration)
(Kystverket / Norwegian Coastal Administration)

 

Norway is known for its fjords, but it may soon be known for a shortcut between them. The Norwegian Coastal Administration just unveiled its plans for a tunnel underneath the Stad Peninsula—a world first for ships.

(Kystverket / Norwegian Coastal Administration)
(Kystverket / Norwegian Coastal Administration)

 

The Stad Ship Tunnel, designed by Snøhetta architects, would connect fjords on either side of the peninsula and allow ships to avoid the Stadhavet Sea—considered “the most exposed and dangerous area along the coast of Norway,” according to a Norwegian Coastal Administration press release.

(Kystverket / Norwegian Coastal Administration)
(Kystverket / Norwegian Coastal Administration)

 

Both an architect’s and civic engineer’s delight, the tunnel would measure just over a mile long, 118 feet wide, and 160 feet tall. Maritime traffic would be limited to one-way, but it’s large enough to accommodate cruise ships and coastal steamers.

(Kystverket / Norwegian Coastal Administration)
(Kystverket / Norwegian Coastal Administration)
(Kystverket / Norwegian Coastal Administration)
(Kystverket / Norwegian Coastal Administration)
(Kystverket / Norwegian Coastal Administration)
(Kystverket / Norwegian Coastal Administration)
(Kystverket / Norwegian Coastal Administration)
(Kystverket / Norwegian Coastal Administration)
(Kystverket / Norwegian Coastal Administration)
(Kystverket / Norwegian Coastal Administration)

 

Even with waits for one-way traffic included, ArchDaily reports the Stad tunnel would shave off significant time ordinarily spent navigating around the peninsula. Between 70 to 120 ships could pass through each day.

The project is estimated to cost about $270 million (2.3 billion Kroner). If it’s approved, construction could begin as early as 2019.

 

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